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VII.6.28 Pompeii. Casa del Peristilio or House of Secundus Tyrannus Fortunatus?

Linked to VII.6.19 and VII.6.20. Excavated 1762, 1808, 1868, 1873 and 1910.

Destroyed by bombing on 13th September 1943 at 17.30hrs.

 

Part 1      Part 2      Part 3

 

According to Garcia y Garcia Region VII, Insula VI was one of the insulae most devastated over the years since its excavation.

He calls it the “Cinderella” of Pompeii. Between the years 1759 and 1762 it was vandalised and stripped by the Bourbons, then re-interred.

Then came the slow and non-systematic uncovering again before the final destruction in September 1943.

The area was ignored and abandoned during the years following the war, which reduced the insula to a heap of bricks and masonry.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.102).

 

According to Fiorelli,

This was a house of which only the entrance corridor had been excavated, the front which was covered in stucco and the remains of a programme:

C . CVSPIVM .PANSAM

    A(ED.OVF)  D.R.P

Readable on the podium in big letters painted in red lead: SIICVNDVS (Tvranvs Fortvnatvs)

This house was the end of the older constructions, existing in the insula, before the aggregations made at the time of the colony.

(Una casa di cui non era disterrato che il solo protiro, ha la fronte rivestita di stucco, ed it resti del programma:

C . CVSPIVM .PANSAM

    A(ED.OVF)  D.R.P

Leggevasi nel podio in grandi lettere dipinte col minio: SIICVNDVS (TVRANVS FORTVNATVS)

Con essa han termine le construzioni piu antiche, esistenti nell’isola, prima delle aggregazioni fattevi ai tempi della colonia.)

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.160).

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Plan based on PPM.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VII. Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 182.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Plan based on PPM.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VII. Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 182.

 

Room 1  - Tablinum (Room 101 in NdS)

Room 2  - Corridor on west of tablinum (Room 102 in NdS)

Room 3  - Rectangular room (Room 103 in NdS)

Room 4  - Peristyle (Room 104 in NdS)

Area 5  -   Recess on west side of peristyle (Room 105 in NdS)

Room 6  - Small rustic room (Room 106 in NdS)

Room 7  - Small rustic room (Room 107 in NdS)

Room 8  - Elegant room, either used as a triclinium or large cubiculum (Room 108 in NdS)

Room 9  - Exedra (Room 190 (109?) in NdS)

Room 10 – Small room, with corridor linking to shops at VII.6.19/20, and other rustic rooms (Room 110 in NdS)

Room 95 – Entrance corridor/fauces (Room 85 in NdS)

Room 96 - Atrium

Room 97 – Cubiculum

Room 98 – Possibly servant/porter’s room (Cella ostiaria)

Room 99 – Rectangular room on east of atrium

Room 1A - Right Ala, room on east of atrium (Room 100 in NdS)

 

Rooms at the rear of rooms 8 and 9, that is 20-29, were also linked to VII.6.28.

  (Rooms 120-129 in NdS, Spano described as rustic rooms “of no importance”.)

Rooms shown as belonging to VII.6.19/20, 10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18 and 19 were also rooms linked to VII.6.28.

  (Rooms 110-119 in NdS, Spano described as rooms which had mostly been excavated before, and therefore not necessary to be described.)

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii (with white step). VII.6.27 and VII.6.26. September 2005. Looking north-west.

VII.6.28 Pompeii (with white step). VII.6.27 and VII.6.26. September 2005. Looking north-west.

 

Pompeii. September 2005. VII.6.30/VII.6.29/VII.6.28 Vicolo dei Soprastanti.

Pompeii. September 2005. VII.6.30/VII.6.29/VII.6.28 Vicolo dei Soprastanti. Looking west.

  

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance with white marble sill. 
Looking north-west towards site of cubiculum on west side of entrance corridor, which was destroyed by bombing.
According to Fiorelli, this house only had the entrance and fauces excavated (by 1873).
On the stucco on the front of the house, there were the remains of the graffiti:
 
C(aium)  Cuspium  Pansam
a[ed](ilem)  d(ignum)  r(ei)  p(ublicae)      [CIL IV 542]
 
and painted in large letters in red –
 
Secundus Tyran(n)us Fortunatus    [CIL IV 543]
 
See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.160).
See Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de)

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance with white marble sill.

Looking north-west towards site of cubiculum or servants’ room (Cella ostiaria) on west side of entrance corridor, which was destroyed by bombing.

According to Fiorelli, this house only had the entrance and fauces excavated (by 1873).

On the stucco on the front of the house, there were the remains of the graffiti:

 

C(aium)  Cuspium  Pansam

a[ed](ilem)  d(ignum)  r(ei)  p(ublicae)      [CIL IV 542]

 

and painted in large letters in red –

 

Secundus Tyran(n)us Fortunatus    [CIL IV 543]

 

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.160).

See Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de)

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. 
Looking south across threshold or sill towards Vicolo dei Soprastanti, from entrance.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking south across threshold or sill towards Vicolo dei Soprastanti, from entrance.

 

Description from Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480, (see in Italian at end of photos).

According to NdS,

The entrance would have been 2.24m wide with a travertine threshold forming a step

 

Entrance corridor, numbered 85, 3.80m long, had flooring of concrete with tesserae of white marble, placed in parallel lines, and forming a slope towards the roadway.

 

From this we entered into the tuscanic atrium, numbered 96, no doorways on its western side, but with two others on the opposite eastern side, one on either side of the entrance corridor/fauces, and three on the northern side of which the middle one formed the entrance to the tablinum. The flooring was like that of the fauces with which it formed a continuation.

 

Nothing remains of the impluvium other than the foundation, formed by large tufa slabs. Perhaps it was covered with marble, removed at the time of the first excavations. Around its edges it was decorated with a wide band of coloured mosaic, showing a braid of white, red, purple/blue and black, between two rows of black scrolls on a white background. On its south side was an underground channel which carried the water from the impluvium into the roadway when the cistern under the peristyle was already full.

The atrium walls retain only scarce remains of a gracious painted decoration, which was best preserved in the western part. This was divided in the main field, into large rectangles with alternative red and black background, the zoccolo/dado was partitioned into lower squares of red and black but arranged so that the red rectangle corresponded to a black square and vice versa. Nothing remained of the frieze.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking south across impluvium in atrium, towards Vicolo dei Soprastanti.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking south across impluvium in atrium, towards Vicolo dei Soprastanti.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Remains of impluvium in atrium.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Remains of impluvium in atrium.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Atrium 96. 1930 photo showing the mosaic border of the impluvium before it was destroyed in 1943.
See Blake M., 1930. The pavements of the Roman buildings of the Republic and early empire. MAAR 8, p. 77, Tav 17,2.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Atrium 96. 1930 photo showing the mosaic border of the impluvium before it was destroyed in 1943.

See Blake M., 1930. The pavements of the Roman buildings of the Republic and early empire. MAAR 8, p. 77, & Tav 17,2.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-east across area of rooms on east side of the atrium.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-east across area of rooms on east side of the atrium.

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480,

Room 97, to the east of the entrance corridor, was probably a cubiculum. The walls showed remains of decoration painted in the II Style.

Room 98, west of the entrance corridor, only had the remains of a high yellow zoccolo on its walls; in the north-west corner was a niche, perhaps a kennel, in which case it was probably the room of the Servus atriensis”.

Room 99 showed the remains of being a rectangular room with flooring of cocciopesto, of walls partitioned in large red rectangles with a black zoccolo. In the centre of each rectangle was a flying swan or a medallion showing an eagle, a flying horned animal, etc.

The following room 100, was entered directly from the atrium or from room 99. The main doorway was as wide as the room which was in fact the right ala, but was lacking a left ala on the opposite side. By means of a step it was divided into two parts, both poorly preserved. The first part, at the front, only had the remaining part of a zoccolo on its north wall, which with a black background, was divided into panels by white lines, and had flooring of signinum, decorated with rows of white tesserae forming a net and lozenge design. The second part, had flooring of simple cocciopesto, forming a cupboard/small room.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north across remains of atrium, andron and tablinum to the area of the south side of the peristyle.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north across remains of atrium, andron and tablinum to the area of the south side of the peristyle.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. 
Looking north across remains of atrium, andron and tablinum to the area of the south side of the peristyle.
The bombing on 13th September 1943 destroyed two cubicula, one in the south-west and the other in the south-east of the atrium. 
It also destroyed the west and east portico of the peristyle, a cubiculum on the east of the peristyle, and the perimeter wall to the north. 
All the painted decoration was lost, the Second style in the tablinum, the Third Style in the cubiculum on the east side of the peristyle, and the beautiful garden painting on the north and east sides of the peristyle.
See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.106-7)

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005.

Looking north across remains of atrium, andron and tablinum to the area of the south side of the peristyle.

The bombing on 13th September 1943 destroyed two cubicula, one in the south-west and the other in the south-east of the atrium.

It also destroyed the west and east portico of the peristyle, a cubiculum on the east of the peristyle, and the perimeter wall to the north.

All the painted decoration was lost, the Second style in the tablinum, the Third Style in the cubiculum on the east side of the peristyle, and the beautiful garden painting on the north and east sides of the peristyle.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.106-7)

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Tablinum west wall. 1917 photo of the remaining painting of the slaughter of the Niobids.
See Hermann P., 1904-1931. Denkmaler der Malerei des Altertums. München: Bruckmann, fig. 60, p. 208-9.
According to PPP this may have been from the west wall of the tablinum.
See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD, p. 153. 
According to Peters, he saw this lower preserved part of the painting in 1954 in the Terme del Foro. In addition to a few figures one could still discern a podium with 3 steps, and the lower part of a column against which a votive tablet is lying.
See Peters, W.J.T. (1963): Landscape in Romano-Campanian Mural Paintings. The Netherlands, Van Gorcum & Comp, p. 76. 
See Dawson C., 1944. Romano-Campanian Mythological Landscape Painting, USA: Yale UP, p.92-3, pl. X.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Tablinum west wall. 1917 photo of the remaining painting of the slaughter of the Niobids.

See Hermann P., 1904-1931. Denkmaler der Malerei des Altertums. München: Bruckmann, fig. 60, p. 208-9.

According to PPP this may have been from the west wall of the tablinum.

See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD, p. 153.

According to Peters, he saw this lower preserved part of the painting in 1954 in the Terme del Foro. In addition to a few figures one could still discern a podium with 3 steps, and the lower part of a column against which a votive tablet is lying.

See Peters, W.J.T. (1963): Landscape in Romano-Campanian Mural Paintings. The Netherlands, Van Gorcum & Comp, p. 76.

See Dawson C., 1944. Romano-Campanian Mythological Landscape Painting, USA: Yale UP, p.92-3, pl. X.

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480,

The Tablinum 101, had its entrance pillars of white stucco but lacking the upper part. In front of the flooring of signinum, the threshold was seen as a wide band decorated with lozenge netting, and in the middle a large disc, also decorated with lozenge netting, and around a wide band showing a meandering line.

The resulting triangles between the band and the disc were decorated with small plants. The remaining floor was decorated with the usual parallel rows of white tesserae. The opposite side from the entrance doorway to the atrium was occupied by a window, originally with windowsills and wooden posts. The side walls carry very evanescent remains of a splendid painted decoration, of the III style.

 

To the left of the tablinum was a corridor 102, which led from the atrium to the peristyle. It had flooring of ordinary cocciopesto and going up towards the peristyle and in the remains of a high zoccolo, were painted in imitation of slabs of black marble with wavy white parallel and oblique veins.

 

The room to the east of the tablinum, was that of a rectangular room 103, with a signinum floor, with remains of painted decoration of the III Style. The middle of each wall would have had the usual canopy, as evidenced the lower part of the columns, preserved in the east and south walls, with large side rectangles on a black background. Nothing remains of the decoration at the top. The zoccolo, better preserved, had a background of purple/turquoise blue with panels of a geometric design and white lines.

 

A small doorway in the north wall, which however formed a high step, led from this room to the peristyle which was found on a higher level.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. 
Looking north-west from rear of tablinum towards remains of west wall of peristyle.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-west from rear of tablinum towards remains of west wall of peristyle.

According to Jashemski –

The garden at the rear of the house was enclosed on the west, east and south by a peristyle supported by ten slender white columns each with sixteen facets.

The spacing of the columns varied according to the width of the openings of three important rooms facing the portico, so that an unimpeded view of the garden could be had.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.185).

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. About 1910. South-west corner of the peristyle.  
In the picture can be seen a low wall or threshold of the tablinum, the andron and the doorway to room 7.  
Also visible is a masonry altar.  This area was devastated by bombing in 1943.
Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei.  Negative number C369.
 
According to Boyce, near the south-west corner of the peristyle stood a rectangular masonry altar, coated with stucco.
On the top of it, traces of burning were visible at the time of excavation.
He also said that holes found in the earth near the altar were explained by Spano (Not.Scavi) as being the decomposed roots of a large tree.
Spano thought this may have been an arbour sacra, which may have been honoured by sacrifice upon the altar.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p. 67, no. 291)
See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, p. 466f and fig. 9,9a.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. About 1910. South-west corner of the peristyle. 

In the picture can be seen a low wall or threshold of the tablinum, the andron and the doorway to room 7. 

Also visible is a masonry altar.  This area was devastated by bombing in 1943.

Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei.  Negative number C369.

 

According to Boyce, near the south-west corner of the peristyle stood a rectangular masonry altar, coated with stucco.

On the top of it, traces of burning were visible at the time of excavation.

He also said that holes found in the earth near the altar were explained by Spano (Not.Scavi) as being the decomposed roots of a large tree.

Spano thought this may have been an arbour sacra, which may have been honoured by sacrifice upon the altar.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p. 67, no. 291)

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, p. 466f and fig. 9,9a.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. 
Looking west from approximate area of room 5, on the west side of the peristyle, towards VII.6.38.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking west from approximate area of room 5, on the west side of the peristyle, towards VII.6.38.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north to area of peristyle, in foreground. 
Slightly to the rear of the remains of the column, on the right, indicates the approximate position of the north wall of the peristyle.
The north wall was where the important garden painting would have been.
VII.6.7 can then be seen, at the rear.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north to area of peristyle, in foreground.

Slightly to the rear of the remains of the column, on the right, indicates the approximate position of the north wall of the peristyle.

The north wall was where the important garden painting would have been. VII.6.7 can then be seen, at the rear.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. About 1910. North wall of peristyle with garden painting.  
This area was devastated by bombing in 1943.
See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas.
Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei.  
Negative number C361.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. About 1910. North wall of peristyle with garden painting. This area was devastated by bombing in 1943.

According to Jashemski –

The rear north wall was divided by four engaged columns, similar to those of the portico, into three panels which were decorated with garden paintings.

A water channel ran around the edges of the garden. A vertical terracotta pipe built into the wall at the rear right, emptied into the water channel.

There was a white marble puteal over the cistern opening between the two east columns of the south portico.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.185)

Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei. 

Negative number C361.

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480,

This peristyle, 104, was a later addition to the house, and on a higher level. Rectangular in shape and surrounded by a portico of all white, slender Doric columns, made of tiles and stucco.  There were four on the southern side, three on the eastern side, five on the western side, always repeating with corner columns. The northern side did not have a portico, but the rear wall was decorated with four semi-in-built columns.

 

The portico flooring was of concrete with parallel rows of white marble tesserae. The walls showed remains of painted decoration, especially to the right of the doorway into 108, where one could see a large red rectangle; with portions of frieze on a white background.  In n’, under the west portico was a cupboard/small room/apotheca: in 105 a recess, with graceful painted decoration, entirely visible from the opposite side by the wide intercolumniation which was before it.

 

The decoration on the main western wall, was preserved only on the lower section; almost fully on the left wall.

 

These walls were divided into large green rectangles, separated by long black bands, showing a magnificent decoration, in a red zoccolo/plinth, and in a frieze with yellow background, preserved only in the southern wall, which I describe.

 

In this the rectangles are only two, and it seemed that nothing was shown in the centre. The decoration of the black dividing band, consisted of two wavy lines, vertical, forming like a row of ellipses, in each of which was suspended a drinking horn, or a crater/large vase, or a basket, or a tambourine. On the upper, external part of each ellipse, two symmetrically arranged birds, waders, perhaps swans, represented alternately in the act of flying or resting with the neck resting between the feathers, in a very natural way. At half the height the row of ellipses was interrupted by the figure of a bird, little recognizable in the details, with wings. In the frieze, architectures. In the red zoccolo/plinth, hangs from a horizontal rod/pole, a green tambourine tied to a long ribbon and two garlands, each held from the opposite end by the beak of a parrot, resting on a blue square.

The left end of this wall was decorated with a long and wide black band, showing a green thyrsus with two spheres tucked into it, decorated at the top with symmetrical flowering branches, on each of them a wading bird very well executed. Further down it was decorated with a horizontal disc, on which two birds peck above a twig.

 

Following to the north was a small rustic room, 106, in which nothing was observed.

 

Behind the cupboard/small room n', another narrow and small rustic room 107.

 

Facing 105, opened on the other side of the peristyle, an elegant room, numbered 108. Rectangular, with marble threshold at the entrance, forming a step and bearing the holes for the wooden jambs. It had white mosaic flooring with two black lines around and was equipped with a small passageway in corridor 120, which extended to the left of it.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. 
Looking north-east towards doorways to rooms 21, site of cubiculum 8, and room 9, on east side of peristyle.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005.

Looking north-east towards doorways to rooms 21, site of cubiculum 8, and room 9, on east side of peristyle.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Glazed two handled cup or skyphos. One of two skyphoi found on 22nd February 1910 in an elegant room to east of peristyle, room 8, (found in room 108 according to NdS, room 8 would seem to be an alternative number for the same room). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 133316. Our thanks to Raffaele Prisciandaro for his help in identifying this object.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Glazed two handled cup or skyphos.

One of two skyphoi found on 22nd February 1910 in an elegant room to east of peristyle, room 8,

(found in room 108 according to NdS, room 8 would seem to be an alternative number for the same room).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 133316.

Our thanks to Raffaele Prisciandaro for his help in identifying this object.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Glazed two handled cup or skyphos. One of two skyphoi found on 22nd February 1910 in an elegant room to east of peristyle, room 8. (Found in room 108 according to NdS, room 8 would seem to be a different number for the same room). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 133315. Our thanks to Raffaele Prisciandaro for his help in identifying this object.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Glazed two handled cup or skyphos.

One of two skyphoi found on 22nd February 1910 in an elegant room to east of peristyle, room 8.

(Found in room 108 according to NdS, room 8 would seem to be a different number for the same room).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 133315.

Our thanks to Raffaele Prisciandaro for his help in identifying this object.

 

201005 Card 05 448

VII.6.28 Pompeii. May 2010. On the right, a small ivory jar with figures in relief, found 29th May 1762.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 77569

(See 29 mag 1762: Fiorelli G., 1860. Pompeianarum antiquitatum historia, Vol. 1: 1748 - 1818, Naples, 1, 147, add. 144 - “Curioso vasetto di avorio con figure a rilievo (MN 77569; Sangiorgio 4932; Ceci, tav. VIII, 44)

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. May 2010. Paintings from one wall of cubiculum 8, recreated in their original position. Displayed in Naples Archaeological Museum.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. May 2010. Paintings from one wall of cubiculum 8, recreated in their original position.

Displayed in Naples Archaeological Museum.

 

70628 cub 8 wall

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found April 1762. Cubiculum 8. 

Four paintings found on the same wall, reflecting their original positions.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus. See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (569).
See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9183.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (569).

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9183.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. Detail from wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. Detail from wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9183.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. Detail from wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. Detail from wall painting of scenes from stories of Dionysus.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9183.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Wall painting of architectural scene with cupid. See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (569).
See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9165.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Wall painting of architectural scene with cupid.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (569).

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9165.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Detail of wall painting of architectural scene.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Detail from wall painting of architectural scene.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9165.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Detail of wall painting of architectural scene.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Detail of wall painting of architectural scene.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9165.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  Fragment of a wall painting with two figures. One is a naked man with a crown of leaves, possibly Apollo. See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1167).
See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 8895.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 10th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. 

Fragment of a wall painting with two figures. One is a naked man with a crown of leaves, possibly Apollo.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1167).

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8895.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Wall painting of Cybele on her throne.
See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (421). See Pagano, M., and  Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 8845.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Wall painting of Cybele on her throne.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (421).

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8845.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall. Wall painting of two Cupids with a dog hunting a faun and a hare. See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (813). See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41). Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9229.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  One of four paintings found on the same wall.

Wall painting of two Cupids with a dog hunting a faun and a hare.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (813).

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9229.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii.  Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8.  
Wall painting with four birds with a bush and bordered by geometric motifs.
See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9870.

VII.6.28 Pompeii.  Found 24th April 1762 in cubiculum 8. 

Wall painting with four birds with a bush and bordered by geometric motifs.

See Pagano, M., and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p.41).

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9870.

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480,

(Room 108), the wall decoration was beautiful, unfortunately very little was preserved. The walls were divided in large rectangles of various colours, in a black zoccolo/dado/plinth. Nothing remains of the frieze. The facing wall,  more narrow, bore only three rectangles with red background, divided by architectural representations, of which the lower part on the right remains, consisting not in one of the usual fantastic architectures, but representing the façade of a true building, equipped with front door and with three windows above, all set askew.

 

The central rectangle bore a picture, of which only the lower right corner was preserved, in which you see a character standing to the left, in Phrygian costume, with leather embroidered trousers, and long mantle, with his left hand lowered and bearing some ordnance Yellow elongated, which I could not distinguish  what it was, and a ribbon, in front of a seated individual, looking to the right. Of this remained only the bare, dark-red legs with feet, above a dark predella. He was holding a pointed lance/pole on the ground.

 

The decoration of the northern wall was almost completely destroyed; but it would have had to be the same as the opposite wall, preserved only in the lower half. This showed five rectangles, of which the first two on the left were blue, the others red. The central of these last three showed a picture, destroyed by the fall of the plaster. The two blue rectangles on the left, were divided by a black band, showing a thyrsus, decorated with flowery branches on which birds peck: the sides of the middle rectangle with the picture, showed architecture of the type of the facing wall. The black zoccolo/base, was partitioned in panels, showing other ornaments.

 

As clearly indicated, by the difference between the two left rectangles and that of the right of the described wall, the room was divided into a larger front half, than a rear half, the difference will have probably also have been indicated by a difference of the roof. And since, by the size of the room it was thought to have been a triclinium, I think instead, that this room would have been a large cubiculum. 

 

Following to the south was an exedra, room (190 (perhaps 109?)) with the entrance as that of the preceding cubiculum, with the columns of the portico forming a wide intercolumniation. This doorway was almost as wide as the room itself, and seemed to have had a mosaic threshold, in continuation of the same one which formed the floor of the room, which was white with a black line around.

 

The walls would have had a splendid painted decoration, but almost entirely faded, which seemed to have been of the III Style. Noted in fact, again were large red rectangles, three in the facing wall, and in greater number but not determinable, in the two side walls with remains of columns characteristic of the III Style. In the centre of the left rectangle of the facing wall, was a bird flying towards the right. The zoccolo, relatively better preserved, was divided into black and red panels/squares, the first corresponding to the rectangle and showing plants; the second corresponding to the dividing space of these, and showed a Victory with outstretched wings folded in the extremities, in the facing wall; and in the side walls, a large bird.

 

Between the large rectangles and the zoccolo, was the remains of a large black horizontal area, which still left a glimpse in the facing wall, of one of the usual representations of gardens, decorated with plutei and pathways with latticework.

 

In the extreme right of the south wall was a small passageway in corridor 110, which linked the house directly with the shops that had entrances in the Vicolo delle Terme, numbered XIX and XX, and with their annexed rustic rooms  (rooms numbered 110-119), which had mostly been excavated before us, and therefore not necessary to be described.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. 
On the left, room 9, and passageway, in centre, leading to shop at VII.6.19.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. September 2005. On the left, room 9, and passageway, in centre, leading to shop at VII.6.19.

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p. 463-480,

And so, I omit to describe also the other rooms belonging to this house and marked with numbers (rooms numbered 120-129 on east side behind rooms 108 and 109), rustic rooms and of no importance. (Spano, 1910)

 

VII.6.7 and 28 Pompeii. September 2005. Stairs of the east wall of the peristyle of VII.6.7 on the left, 
The east wall of the latrine of VII.6.7 is centre left, and VII.6.28 on the right, behind the column.

VII.6.7 and 28 Pompeii. September 2005. Stairs of the east wall of the peristyle of VII.6.7 on the left,

The east wall of the latrine of VII.6.7 is centre left, and VII.6.28 on the right, behind the column.

 

VII.6.11 and 28 Pompeii. 1910. Looking north from the rear of VII.6.28. 
The capitals of the House of Pansa can be seen in the centre of the photo.
(This may be photographed from room 22 of VII.6.28, with room 71 of VII.6.11 behind the wall on the right.
The lower room ahead may be room 70, linking through to room 68.
Room 68 and 69 would appear to run in a line connected to the NW corner of the cistern building, in the centre right.
Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VII.6.11 and 28 Pompeii. 1910. Looking north from the rear of VII.6.28.

The capitals of the House of Pansa can be seen in the centre of the photo.

(This may be photographed from room 22 of VII.6.28, with room 71 of VII.6.11 behind the wall on the right.

The lower room ahead may be room 70, linking through to room 68.

Room 68 and 69 would appear to run in a line connected to the NW corner of the cistern building, in the centre right.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Architectural painting with two birds, figs and cherries.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Architectural painting with two birds, figs and cherries.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. 1968. Architectural painting with two birds, figs and cherries.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9733.
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J68f1626
According to Prisciandaro and Pagano, the above was found with other pictures and a mosaic threshold -
30 Apr 1762   PAH I, 1, 145-146, VII, vi, 28 “si sono scoperte 3 pitture: 
 - la prima, di tre pal. e nove per diciotto on., rappresenta un tordo che mangia dei fichi, un mulo che sembra che stia mangiando alcuni corbezzoli su un ramo 
       (showing a thrush eating figs, a mule that seems to be eating some arbutus on a branch) 
       (MN 9733; AdE IV, 25, 123; NR 1115; Helb. 1620)
 - pal. 3, on. 9 x on. 15, merlo con ciliegia nel becco, ramo e tre ciliegie, altro merlo
       (showing blackbird with cherry in the beak, branch with three cherries, and another blackbird) -  
       (MN 8746; AdE IV, 20, 95; NR 1116; Arditi 1112). 
 - Note: MN 8748, a picture with the same subject may have come from the same place AdE IV, 20,95; NR 1117.
 - mela cotogna e tre frutti 
 - sulla stessa parete vi sono altri uccelli e una donna, però sono consumati 
 - soglia a mosaico decorata con vasi, alberi, rami e fiori con tessere bianche, nere, azzurre e gialle, di pal. 2 e on. 9” 
   (MN sn; sala CXIV; attributi di Iside).
See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi, p. 41.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. 1968. Architectural painting with two birds, figs and cherries.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9733.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f1626

According to Prisciandaro and Pagano, the above was found with other pictures and a mosaic threshold -

30 Apr 1762   PAH I, 1, 145-146, VII, vi, 28 “si sono scoperte 3 pitture:

 - la prima, di tre pal. e nove per diciotto on., rappresenta un tordo che mangia dei fichi, un merlo che sembra che stia mangiando alcuni corbezzoli su un ramo

       (showing a thrush eating figs, a blackbird that seems to be eating some strawberries on a branch)

       (MN 9733; AdE IV, 25, 123; NR 1115; Helb. 1620)

 - pal. 3, on. 9 x on. 15, merlo con ciliegia nel becco, ramo e tre ciliegie, altro merlo

       (showing blackbird with cherry in the beak, branch with three cherries, and another blackbird) - 

       (MN 8746; AdE IV, 20, 95; NR 1116; Arditi 1112).

 - Note: MN 8748, a picture with the same subject may have come from the same place AdE IV, 20,95; NR 1117.

 - mela cotogna e tre frutti

 - sulla stessa parete vi sono altri uccelli e una donna, però sono consumati

 - soglia a mosaico decorata con vasi, alberi, rami e fiori con tessere bianche, nere, azzurre e gialle, di pal. 2 e on. 9”

   (MN sn; sala CXIV; attributi di Iside).

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi, p. 41.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. 1968. Detail from painting showing blackbird with three cherries found 30th April 1762.. 
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J68f1627

VII.6.28 Pompeii. 1968. Detail from painting showing blackbird with three cherries found 30th April 1762.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f1627

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. A thrush eating figs and a blackbird eating cherries.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.
See Antichità di Ercolano: Tomo Quarto: Le Pitture 4, 1765, pl. 25, p. 123. 
See PAH I, 1, 145-146.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. A thrush eating figs and a blackbird eating cherries.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9733.

See Antichità di Ercolano: Tomo Quarto: Le Pitture 4, 1765, pl. 25, p. 123.

See PAH I, 1, 145-146.

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Detail of blackbird with cherries from painting in Naples Archaeological Museum.  
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8746.
1968.  Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J68f0834

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Detail of blackbird with cherries from painting in Naples Archaeological Museum. 

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8746.

1968.  Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f0834

 

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Drawing of 1765 showing blackbird with cherries and another blackbird with figs. 
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8746.
According to Prisciandaro and Pagano, this may also have come from the same place as the other pictures described above:
-  pal. 3, on. 9 x on. 15, merlo con ciliegia nel becco, ramo e tre ciliegie, altro merlo (showing blackbird with cherry in the beak, branch and three cherries, and another blackbird.
-  MN 8746; AdE IV, 20, 95; NR 1116; Arditi 1112.
See Antichità di Ercolano: Tomo Quarto: Le Pitture 4, 1765, pl. 20, p. 95. 
Note: MN 8748, a picture with the same subject may have come from the same place.

VII.6.28 Pompeii. Found 30th April 1762. Drawing of 1765 showing blackbird with cherries and another blackbird with figs.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8746.

According to Prisciandaro and Pagano, this may also have come from the same place as the other pictures described above:

-  pal. 3, on. 9 x on. 15, merlo con ciliegia nel becco, ramo e tre ciliegie, altro merlo (showing blackbird with cherry in the beak, branch and three cherries, and another blackbird).

-  MN 8746; AdE IV, 20, 95; NR 1116; Arditi 1112.

See Antichità di Ercolano: Tomo Quarto: Le Pitture 4, 1765, pl. 20, p. 95.

Note: MN 8748, a picture with the same subject may have come from the same place.

 

(Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.473 onwards) -

Also, various graffiti inscriptions came to light –

 

On the west wall of corridor 102, to the west of the tablinum

 

On the west wall of corridor 102, to the west of the tablinum

 

On the right pilaster of room 109, on the cocciopesto plaster in letters of 2 to 3 cms.

49.

On the right pilaster of room 109, on the cocciopesto plaster in letters of 2 to 3 cms.
49.

 

50. On the white stucco of a peristyle column, in a decorative motif, (baccellatura) above a design representing a gladiator –

50. On the white stucco of a peristyle column, in a decorative motif, (baccellatura) above a design representing a gladiator –

 

51. Above another decorative motif, (baccellatura)

51. Above another decorative motif, (baccellatura) –

 

52. Above a decorative motif, (baccellatura) turned to the north of the second column on the south side –

52. Above a decorative motif, (baccellatura) turned to the north of the second column on the south side –

 

53. On a red pilaster to the right of the entrance doorway of room 108 –

 

53. On a red pilaster to the right of the entrance doorway of room 108 -

 

54. Higher and to the right of the preceding one –

 

54. Higher and to the right of the preceding one -

 

55. on the gash (squarcio) of the same pilaster, turned towards the doorpost of the room

55. on the gash (squarcio) of the same pilaster, turned towards the door-post of the room

 

56. A little bit under –

56. A little bit under –

 

57. Under to the left –

57. Under to the left –

 

58.

58.

 

59.

59.

 

Along the north and west sides of the peristyle, many ordinary terracotta amphorae were found, some of which had inscriptions, here reported -

 

60. In red -

60. In red -

 

61. In black -

61. In black -

 

62. In large red letters -

62. In large red letters -

 

63. In white -

 

63. In white -

 

64. In black letters, 2cms high –

 

 

65. In black –

65. In black –

 

66. in black, on the one side -

66. in black, on the one side -

 

67. In black, on the other side -

67. In black, on the other side -

 

68. In carbon, on one side -

68. In carbon, on one side -

 

69. On the other side -

69. On the other side -

 

70. In red letters, on one side -

70. In red letters, on one side -

 

71. On the other side -

71. On the other side -

 

 

Part 1      Part 2      Part 3

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 28-Aug-2019 18:06